Potter County Courthouse Bell Ringing Again!

October 20th, 2016 Comments off

mayorbrendawhitmanbellJune18PotterCommissBellToRingA historic bell that hangs in the tower of the Potter County Courthouse sounded 11 times on Thursday, highlighting an observance welcoming its restoration. Coudersport Mayor Brenda Whitman conducted the brief ceremony at the courthouse square gazebo at 11 am Thursday. The Potter County Commissioners earlier this year approved a $7,600 contract with Verdin Company to install automatic ringing equipment on the bell. It has been programmed to chime on the hour and can also sound for special occasions. Funds for the work were raised by Mayor Whitman, who has been assisted by machinist Bill Daly and Joe Kurtz, the county’s supervisor of building and grounds maintenance. Precautions have been to assure that the new equipment will not damage the bell or its housing in the clock tower. The bell was donated to Potter County by Timothy Ives. One of Coudersport’s earliest inhabitants, Ives built a general merchandise store, was elected county treasurer and later served as judge. The bell has been programmed to ring on the hour from 7 am to 10 pm. (Bell photo by Curt Weinhold)

New Potter County Veterans Affairs Director Introduced

October 17th, 2016 Comments off

billsimpsonPotter County’s new director of veterans affairs, Bill Simpson, was introduced during a meeting of the Potter County Board of Commissioners. Simpson, a resident of Oswayo, succeeds Will Worthington. A graduate of Oswayo Valley High School, Simpson served with the U.S Navy for more than 23 years. He recently retired after 30-plus years of service as a communications technician with Frontier Communications. Simpson was recently certified as a county veterans affairs director by the Pa. Dept. of Military and Veterans Affairs. This allows him to file claims with the VA for benefits and services on behalf of local military veterans. He intends to develop close working relationships with veterans service organizations in Potter County and build on the record of service established by his predecessors. Potter County has received multiple excellence awards for its veterans’ services. Simpson’s office is located on the first floor of the F. W. Gunzburger County Office Building at 1 North Main Street in Coudersport. Office hours for appointments and walk-ins will be announced. He can be reached at 814-274-8290, extension 210, or bsimpson@pottercountypa.net.

Sample Ballot For Nov. 8 Election On County Website

October 13th, 2016 Comments off

voter_regVoters who believe they may not be able to visit the polls between 7 am and 8 pm on Election Day (Tuesday, Nov. 8) may be eligible to vote by absentee ballot. These ballots are available at the Elections/Voter Registration Office in the Gunzburger Building on North Main Street in Coudersport. Director of Elections Sandy Lewis has posted sample ballots for each of the county’s voting districts on the county website, pottercountypa.net (click on Departments and go to Elections/Voter Registration). Polling locations, links to relevant sites, deadlines, and other useful information can also be found on the same site. For more information, call 814-274-8467 or send email to slewis@pottercountypa.net.

Master Plan For Denton Hill State Park Available

October 3rd, 2016 Comments off

savedentonChallenges and opportunities are spelled out in a report on the future of Denton Hill State Park, part of a multi-year process to have the park revitalized and its ski resort resurrected. From a long-range perspective, the park’s future appears to be bright as long as the state is willing to invest in it. State officials have posted initial results of an incremental planning process geared toward developing improved skiing and new off-season activities at the park. The preliminary Denton Hill State Park Master Plan is available on a section of the Pa. Dept. of Conservation and Natural Resources website, available here. Soon, DCNR will select a consulting firm to guide the master planning process. A public meeting to discuss the scope of work is expected to be held before year’s end.

Initial studies found that the state would need to invest about $13 million to repair ski lifts, add lights, replace the snowmaking system, renovate the lodge, add parking and create a snow-tubing park. Additional investments may be required for development of spring, summer and autumn activities. Among options are lift-serviced mountain biking, zip lines, festivals, adventure races, geocaching and destination dining. The plan cautions that the skiing business will need to attract at least 12,500 visits per season to be profitable. Denton Hill has experienced sharp declines in visitation over the past 10 years, much of it due to warm weather but some attributed to skiers going elsewhere.

A local stakeholders committee headed by the Potter County Board of Commissioners is serving as the liaison with DCNR. One of the committee’s partners, the Potter County Visitors Assn. (PCVA), has launched a Save Denton Hill State Park site on the Facebook social media platform and signed up more than 2,000 supporters, with tens of thousands of “hits.” Among other coalition members are the Chambers of Commerce in Coudersport, Galeton and Wellsboro and the Pennsylvania Route 6 Alliance. They’re conferring frequently with elected officials and representatives of the Pa. Dept. of Conservation and Natural Resources (both the State Parks and Forestry bureaus).

closedThere is a lot at stake. A study of the ski resort’s impact found that visitors spent more than $2.74 million on their trips in a single year. Stakeholders see the park in bigger terms, suggesting that it be a hub for tourists that could complement local hiking trails, state parks, the Pennsylvania Lumber Museum and other local attractions. The partners would like to see not only restoration of ski operations, but development of the park as a year-round asset. DCNR engaged Moshier Studio, a Pittsburgh firm, to study Denton Hill State Park and prepare the initial report that’s available for public review. There will be no skiing at the park for the 2016-17 season and signs point to the closure extending through the 2017-18 season and beyond.

Drug Forum Examines Epidemic Affecting Potter County

September 15th, 2016 Comments off

Andy Watson

Fatal heroin overdoses, families ripped apart, decaying communities and a rising financial toll for taxpayers – these are among the devastating consequences of a drug epidemic that has swept across northern Pennsylvania and shown its ugly face in Potter County. Three public officials in the forefront of trying to stem the tide reported on their progress and offered some advice to families and community members during a public presentation at the Oswayo Valley Memorial Library in Shinglehouse. Speakers were Potter County District Attorney Andy Watson, Shinglehouse Borough Police Chief Brad Buchholz and Potter County Drug and Alcohol Programs Administrator Colleen Wilber.

Watson explained that the law enforcement community has seen a meteoric rise in serious drug cases since 2010. He has been a central figure in the establishment and operation of a regional law enforcement strike force that has intercepted some drug trafficking through undercover officers and confidential informants. Buchholz has also played a role on the strike force, which is part of a statewide initiative controlled by the office of Pennsylvania Attorney General. They showed samples of heroin packets that are commonly available in Potter County, inexpensive and often adulterated or “cut” with other substances.


Brad Buchholz

The D.A. cited more than 100 arrests since the strike force began its work, some of which involved major dealers linked to distribution networks centered in Williamsport and other more populated areas. Watson encouraged citizens to be on the lookout for suspicious behavior that could be related to drug trafficking. He also discussed a new initiative that encourages those who are addicted to illicit substances to contact law enforcement officials for referral to treatment options as an alternative to criminal prosecution. Buchholz suggested that parents monitor their children’s internet or mobile device use, since those electronic tools are used for 90 percent or more of drug transactions.

Wilber’s spoke of services available through the county. Her agency assesses drug and alcohol offenders for addiction and connects them with treatment options. Services are available to all county residents – not just those involved the criminal justice system. She and Watson serve on a team that administers two “treatment courts” that provide alternatives to traditional criminal justice disposition in some cases.


Colleen Wilber

Potter County has received national and state accolades for some of its early forays into innovative programs that are geared toward reducing jail populations and more effectively addressing issues and circumstances that can lead an individual to criminal activity. Senior Judge John Leete presides over the DUI and Drug Treatment Courts, while President Judge Stephen Minor has been a driving force behind their establishment. Potter County Commissioners Doug Morley, Paul Heimel and Susan Kefover have also been supportive, providing increased staffing in the county’s Probation Department and establishment of a Women’s Residential Recovery Center in Harrison Valley.


Contract Renewed For Tioga/Potter 911 Center

August 29th, 2016 Comments off

911-dispatcher-hangs-up-on-lifePotter County’s close partnership with its neighbor to provide reliable 24/7 communications for emergency responders will continue through 2020. Boards of Commissioners from Potter and Tioga counties approved a contract to continue dispatching services from the Tioga County 911 Center in Wellsboro through 2020. By joining forces, the two counties have been able to deliver speedy dispatching to fire, ambulance and police agencies. They’ve also cushioned the economic impact of the state-mandated service through shared infrastructure and other resources. The two-county system covering a region as large as the state of Delaware has been used as a model for other rural counties. Potter County pays Tioga County an annual fee covering a share of expenses at the dispatch center. Potter’s cost is $72,100 for 2016, rising annually to $81,149 for 2020. Each county is responsible for the network of coordinated towers and other infrastructure.

Counties are required by state law to provide 911 communications. Tioga County Emergency Services Director David Cohick worked closely with his counterpart in Potter County, John Hetrick, to forge the partnership and install the compatible technology across two counties. Since Hetrick’s retirement, the collaboration continues between Cohick; Potter County Commissioner Doug Morley, who doubles as emergency services director; and Glenn Dunn, Potter County emergency management coordinator. Some 23 towers are in place to service Potter and Tioga counties as well as parts of McKean, Bradford and Lycoming counties, across a 2,500-mile coverage area. The 911 dispatch center serves 26 fire companies, 26 police stations, and 20 ambulance agencies. Seventeen dispatchers are on staff, with three on the job during each shift.